Tuesday, April 18, 2017

BRIGG PUMP BLESSING CEREMONY COMING UP


The annual Blessing of the Pumps ceremony will again take place in Brigg town centre.
Flowers will be placed around the former communal pumps on Bridge Street (pictured above - close to the Nelthorpe Arms pub) and on Grammar School Road South (below) alongside JD Wetherspoon's White Horse pub.
The 2017 date for the blessing is Saturday, May 20.
Interested members of the public can meet up at the Market Place Bandstand from 10.30am.
Further details to follow on Brigg Blog nearer the time.
This annual event draws spectators from far and wide and we hope that rail campaigner Paul Johnson will help spread the word so people from North Nottinghamshire, Gainsborough, Grimsby and Cleethorpes will use the Saturday morning passenger train service to come to Brigg to watch the ceremony.
While in Brigg, the train travellers can visit our shops and eateries, helping to boost trade.
Getting a supply of clean water from Wrawby piped to Brigg was a major step forward for public health, even though poorer households without taps on the premises had to take buckets to the communal pumps to draw their ration.
Killer diseases like cholera and typhoid could be caught from drinking tainted supplies until the Victorians got to grips will the problem. 
Those in authority in Brigg - perhaps the Urban District Council, founded in the 1890s - thought fit to preserve these town pumps long after they were taken out of use. 
Most towns and villages removed theirs.


2 comments:

Friends of the Brigg Line said...

Details already in system to promote, targeted areas will be informed, if any spare A4 posters are around will be happy to put in railway posterboards

Ken Harrison said...

.....then the pumps, themselves, became a source of cholera, circa the turn of C19th/C20th.
The water from St Helen's Well was gravity Fed to tanks below the pumps.
These reservoirs became contaminated, primary from the state of Brigg's sewage system...and it didn't help that the pumps were respectively sited near pubs with their primitive sanitation..